Railfan & Railroad Magazine

Subscribe Today

Meet the Staff

Railfan Hot Rail News

Railfan Timetable

Railfan Extra Board

Railfan Photo Line

Railfan Archive

Contact Us

Find us on Facebook

Support our Sponsors



Railfan Photo Line - November 2013

Railfan Photo Line

LET'S DO THE TIME WARP AGAIN... Subway cars from two different systems pose at the north end of trackage during the annual night photo session at the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine. A set from Boston's Blue Line waits with two New York City trains from different eras. Founded in 1939, STM has grown into the largest electric railway museum in the world with a collection representing almost every major American city that had a streetcar system.

Night photo session at Seashore Trolley Museum

by Steve Barry/photos by the author

Photo Line Welcome to Photo Line! The venerable Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine, hosted its annual night photography workshop on November 2, 2013. A group of 34 photographers took part in the event, which was coordinated by STM volunteer Joey Kelley. Lumedyne flash was provided by Shawn Duren and R&R editor Steve Barry.

Photo Line

AT THE LOOP

Connecticut Company 1160 car rests at the station and visitors center that are the centerpiece of the museum. Car No. 1160 was built in 1906 by the John Stephenson Car Co., and came from the Connecticut Company in 1948 after closure of its last streetcar division in New Haven.

Photo Line

NORTH SHORE AND DOWN UNDER

The museum has an extensive collection of streetcars, interurban cars, subway cars and freight motors. Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee "Silverliner" 755 sits next to an open tram from Sydney, Australia. Car no. 755 was built by the Standard Steel Company of Pittsburgh in 1930, is a representative of the last order for passenger coaches placed by the Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee.

Photo Line

MOUNTAIN STATE CAR

Wheeling Traction Company No. 639 is nicely painted in yellow and traction orange. No. 639 is a Cincinnati curved-side built in 1924 for West Virginia's Wheeling Traction Company, later Co-Operative Transit Company. It is one of few survivors of hundreds of curved-side cars and is the standard model that once ran in the Midwest and South. The body was aquired in 1957 and has been the subject of a multi-year restoration and rehabilitation.

Photo Line

THE LIBERTY BELL ROUTE

Lehigh Valley Transit no. 1030 ran on the "Liberty Bell Route" between Philadelphia and Allentown. A remnant of this line still operates as the Norristown High Speed Line for SEPTA. Originally built for the Indiana Railroad in 1931, it was retired in 1941 and brought to Pennsylvania. Upon its retirement in 1951, it was acquired by the museum. Although No. 1030 came to the Museum in fairly good shape, its aluminum cladding had serious corrosion problems. With substantial support from Lehigh Valley area enthusiasts, the car has been completely restored to its original parlor car appearance as it was in the best days of service on the Liberty Bell Route.

Photo Line

FREIGHT POWER

Two freight motors meet at Tower C at the museum. Freight motor 300 was built by Baldwin-Westinghouse in February 1920 and worked its entire life on the Oshawa Railway until it was retired in 1964 and purchased by Seashore Trolley Museum.

Photo Line

ON HOME RAILS

Atlantic Shore Line Railway No. 100 pauses at the museum's Arundel section house. The venerable motor operated on this very right-of-way in regular service, as the museum's trackage is on the ASL grade. It was built in 1906 by Laconia Car Co. and was recently subject to a multi-year restoration and rebuilding by museum volunteers.

Photo Line

BEANTOWN VETERANS

Both the Blue Line cars and Tower C are veterans of the Boston transit system. Upon retirement of the Orange Line elevated in 1987, Tower C was moved to the museum via barge, which was chronicled in the September 1979 issue of Railfan & Railroad. The Blue Line cars were built by Hawker-Siddley in 1978, and are among the newest members of the museum fleet arriving in 2009.

Photo Line

NUTMEG MEET AT TOWER C

Two cars from the Connecticut Company meet at Tower C. ConnCo 303 is an open bench car built by the Brill Co. in 1901, making it one of the oldest cars in the fleet. Long after open cars had been withdrawn from regular service, the Connecticut Company kept many of them in New Haven to shuttle football fans between the railroad station and the Yale Bowl on game days. Although these cars had a nominal seating capacity of 75, they often carried several times that number standing between the benches and hanging on outside. New Haven streetcar service was discontinued in September of 1948, but the last Yale Bowl open cars ran in the 1947 football season.

Photo Line

THE CAR THAT STARTED IT ALL

Biddeford & Saco River open car No. 31 was the car that started it all. It was the first car acquired by Seashore Trolley Museum. Appropriately, this Brill car operated in Maine in regular service from 1900 until its retirement in 1939.

Connecticut Company's Streetcars

Connecticut Company's Streetcars

Order your copy from the Carstens Book Store today!

Traction Planbook

Traction Planbook

Order your copy from the Carstens Book Store today!

Railfan Photo Line

Railfan Photo Line welcomes your submissions. We're looking for a themed topic (and "theme" can be interpreted fairly broadly) with five to eight photos. Each photo should be no smaller than 14 inches (or 1024 pixels) across at 72 dpi (no verticals, please). Brief caption information must accompany each photo. Please send your inquiries to the Webmaster for consideration.
 
 

About Our Company

White River Productions

 

Our Publications

Railroad Model Craftsman

Model Railroad News

Railfan & Railroad

Passenger Train Journal

TRP Magazine

Railroads Illustrated

On30 Annual

HOn3 Annual

Shop Our Products

Subscribe Today

Books

 

White River Productions

©2009-2014 All Rights Reserved :: White River Productions :: P.O. Box 48 :: Bucklin, MO 64631 :: (816) 285-6560